A PICKER OR A THROWER

Even though we all either pick or throw, we each have a different way of tensioning our yarn. This is one of the reasons that gauge is so important when working on garments—there are infinite ways to tension yarn, some methods give more tension and some less, resulting in tighter or looser stitches.Fig 1

Learn to Pick (or Throw)!

If you’re a thrower, here’s a quick lesson on picking:

To knit: Hold the working yarn behind the needles and use your right hand to bring the right needle into the first stitch on the left needle (from front to back), rotate it counterclockwise (over and behind in a scooping motion) around the taut working yarn, and back out of the stitch, pulling the new stitch through the old as you slide the old stitch off the left needle (Fig. 1).

To purl: Hold the yarn in front of the work and insert the right needle behind the yarn and down (from back to front) into the first stitch on the left needle. Rotate the right Fig 2needle around the yarn counterclockwise (over, behind, and around to the front again), then push the needle to the back, pulling the new stitch through the old and sliding the old stitch off the left needle as you do so (Fig. 2). Some knitters find it helpful to use their right thumb or forefinger to prevent the yarn from sliding off the tip of the right needle as they pull the stitch through. Others like to move their left forefinger downward slightly to hold the new stitch in place as it is pulled through to completion.

If you’re a picker, here’s a quick lesson on throwing:

Fig 3To knit: Hold the working yarn in back of the work and insert the right needle up (from front to back) into the first stitch on the left needle, so that the needle tip extends about an inch (2.5 cm) beyond the stitch. Grasp the right needle with your left thumb and forefinger (without letting go of the left needle), bring the yarn forward with your right forefinger, and wrap it around the right needle tip counterclockwise (behind the needle then to the front between the two needles) [Fig. 3]. Retrieve the right needle with your right hand and use that needle to draw the new stitch through the old as you slide the old stitch off the left needle. Tighten the yarn w ith your right hand to tension the stitch.

To purl: Hold the yarn in front and insert the right needle “down” (from back to front) into the stitch, so that the tip extends about an inch (2.5 cm) beyond the stitch. Grasp the rFig 4ight needle with your left thumb and forefinger as you use your right forefinger to wrap the yarn around the right needle tip counterclockwise (over and behind the needle, then to the front between the two needles) [Fig. 4]. Move both hands back into their starting position as you use the right needle to draw the new stitch through the old and off the needle. Tighten the stitch with your right hand.

As you practice these new techniques, you’ll feel like you’re a beginning knitter again—all thumbs wrapped up in string. Just keep at it, remembering to breath and relax your shoulders. And pick a project—like a felted bag, a dishcloth, or something else that’ll be forgiving but ultimately useful—and throw or pick away.

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HANDCRAFT THEM YOURSELF

I would like to share this article with you, I’m sure all the handcrafters out there would feel the same and even people who have never made anything themselves would like to have a go.

If you do get in touch with me I will teach or help you to knit www.bexknitwear.com

Here is the article… http://www.crafttestdummies.com/2009/10/26/the-hand-crafted-look-is-ins/

MY CREATIVITY

My creativity is many things, but I spend most of my time knitting. I love to knit, I knit watching television, listening to music, I arrange my knitting time around my t.v programmes, what I like to knit to, something that doesn’t need too much concentration like a good football match or the soap opera’s.

This is what I knitted when watching Liverpool last night…

Hand knitted Dennis the Menace jumper

Hand knitted Dennis the Menace jumper